The online magazine on the history and operation of vintage scale model trains in American OO gauge

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

An amazing ATSF 2-8-2 by James Trout, and the art of scratch building steam

The name of James Trout has come up a few times in this site now, but for quick reference he was a longtime Disney illustrator and an American OO enthusiast (longer overview here).

Among his interests were the ATSF, and he built this fine model of ATSF 2-8-2 4027. Internet resources I’m finding would indicate the prototype is a Baldwin product from 1923.

This model is simply outstanding and a prime example of scratch building from a time before the Internet and other distractions. All in all, the craftsmanship is just so high, it is intimidating if I am honest. I could never duplicate this model. Click on any of the photos for a bigger view.

When 4027 got to me it would not run, as the motor was damaged. I was able to fix that by switching out some parts; and the model bench tests fine now! Unfortunately, there is a short on the insulated side of one of the drivers, so it won’t run down the track. It might be due to some subtly bent part that I’m not seeing, but, even then, the model is too large to run on my curves, so I think it is best to leave it as it is, a beautiful display model.

I still had it in a box to work on among my projects, as a cab seat fell out after working on the drive. With the model apart, it was a good time to also take some photos for this article. The boiler is held on with just two small screws.

Starting with the boiler, wow. Maybe some commercial fittings here and there, but this is quite an impressive, one of a kind model in 4mm scale. Lots of Santa Fe specific details, so many neatly fabricated and soldered parts and wires, and of course the hand lettered numbers. It is a little dusty from prior display, but I’m thinking it would not be a good idea to clean it aggressively.

Surprisingly, the back head of the boiler, in the cab, is not detailed at all, but note the side curtains made from tissue paper. And the window glass is, of course, real glass.

The frame holds a secret that is not easy to see in the photos; this model is actually built on a Nason 2-8-0 frame and possibly drivers, with the lead truck being modified Nason. Look at all those added details! The front coupler it should be noted is a working coupler, built to scale. The side rods and such are certainly not Nason, he fabricated parts that are accurate to scale.

To the tender, that is all scratch built, other than the Kadee coupler on the rear. That I believe was added much later, the model itself I would guess to date from maybe 1950. There is an old repair to the back of the tender that is not nearly as finely done as the model itself, perhaps done at the same time as the Kadee installation.

Speaking of scratch building, this is also not very visible in the photos but what are those trucks on the tender? They are not commercial and are actually built up from many parts. The journal boxes are sprung with small springs, etc.; the work that must have been required merely to fabricate those trucks from scratch is mind boggling. Today one would think about 3D printing unusual parts such as these.

This is absolutely the most exquisite model I own. Growing up on the ATSF it is a huge treat to own this engine.

In addition to this one locomotive, I own a variety of passenger and freight cars from his workshop. I am so glad to be able to own a group of the Trout models, some of which have been featured in this site previously. With others of his needing similar small repairs, and an ongoing reorganization of my storage system, be watching for more of his models to be featured here.

A final note would be there are other Trout locomotives out there. I have photos of some of them, models for his West Coast Lines and for sure one more big ATSF engine, 4-8-4 3763. May they all be long enjoyed by others.

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