The online magazine on the history and operation of vintage scale model trains in American OO gauge

Sunday, October 14, 2018

A scratch built modern OO tank car

I finally got to my final tank car project from the summer, fixing a few issues with this modern tank car built mostly from brass by Bill Johann.

From the side you can tell it is not a HO conversion, this is a large model of a prototype nearly 60’ long. Where it was worse for the wear over the years was the railing around the dome. I got it nearly back to the original configuration; when it came to me it was pretty much flattened out.

The other thing I did was very lightly fill in just a few chips. I was going to try to do this on the Trout built tank cars in the recent post, but I think the cure will look worse than the problem so I will leave those alone. In this case though, eliminating a few splotches of raw brass was the right call.

From the bottom you can see Johann worked over this model several times. I think one of the most interesting details are the trucks. He modified Lionel trucks to be roller bearing trucks with rotating axle ends. Half of the caps are missing at this point. The wheels are I believe Athearn Diesel wheels set up like S-C wheels. Oh, and he also built up a new, insulated bolster from plastic and metal. It was no small task to accomplish, and the resulting trucks roll quite well for his effort.

With that I’m done with tank cars for a while except for having some lined up to decal. Good projects for the fall.

Saturday, October 6, 2018

Five more freight cars by James Trout

There are some interesting things to note with these stock cars, tank cars, and the flat car by artist James Trout. (More on his background here).

First up are these two stock cars. I take the one in the front to be one of his earliest attempts at scratchbuilding in OO, and the one in the rear a relatively late project. WCS 26003 is built up from wood and completely hand lettered, and note that the really small lettering is representational only, merely small marks. WCS 26907 on the other hand is basically a nicely built Scale-Craft kit but with upgraded ladders, a modern roof walk, and it is nicely weathered as well. But note the lettering is all done with decals.

The bottom view reveals the truck and brake details. The early model has Nason trucks with a Nason brake cylinder – but noting also the trucks have modified Lionel wheelsets with the flanges turned down. The S-C model has some upgrades, but is by no means super detailed. On all of these photos click for a closer look.

Next up we have these tank cars. The car in the front is built from a Scale-Craft kit and the UP car in the rear is Lionel. Both have interesting modifications that are not all visible in the photos. One of the most interesting is he used brass strips on the S-C car and brass wire on the Lionel car to duplicate the tie-downs that would be on the prototype holding the tank to the frame. Both cars are lettered with decals, but his hand lettering makes an appearance, fixing a decal issue on the SDRX car and painting the hazard sign on the UP car.

The bottom view also reveals the added brake details. This is a great addition to these cars as they are so visible. The Kadee couplers being added much more recently to these models likely built in the 1940s or 50s. Another thing to note, these cars are not black. Being an artist, he knew that a very deep gray looks more realistic. The cars are each slightly different in color. Finally, there is more of the small "marks" lettering on the frame of the S-C car, representing very small lettering.

Finally, we have this flat car, WCS 27425. It is longer than the comparable S-C model at 52', and is a light model, wood with added details. The lettering is a mix of decals and hand lettering, the large lettering being done by his steady hand. The only commercial parts are the Schorr trucks, couplers, and brake wheel.

Based on how the trucks are applied I’m thinking it was built originally with a different brand of truck, maybe Nason. There are no brake details but I love the look of the frame and floor from below.

All I have done to this point on these cars is gentle cleaning with Q-tips and water. I’m going to work on matching the tank car colors, and if I can come up with near perfect matches I hope to fill in the chips on those cars as well, those are nice cars that deserve to see service on the layout.

UPDATE: But it is not easy to match the color and sheen. Who knows what type of paint was used and it was likely custom mixed. So for now the cars are just cleaned up and stored safely.