The online magazine on the history and operation of vintage scale model trains in American OO gauge

Thursday, June 28, 2018

American OO in the 1960s, part II: Brass

The most notable OO brass importer of the 1960s was of course Fred. E. Schorr Jr. In my files are a pair of mimeographed price sheets from the later 1960s which offer some business insights.

The first one is dated June 20, 1966 with an address on Lee Park Avenue in Wilkes Barre, PA. The text makes clear that one purpose is to take pre-orders with “deposits not less than 10% of total order.” “The following items will be available from Japan in approximately 90 days,” specifically,

The prospects of more Bettendorf trucks in “OO” depend on confirmed responses to this announcement. I must order a minimum of 500 pairs and while the price is higher I feel I can reasonably offer them at $1.50 per pair. Your response to this will determine if I should at this time order a minimum or 500 pairs.

Following that is a list of what he actually has in stock, with prices. He has 7 of the RDC2 models at $18.95 each, 3 of the RDC3 models at $21.95 each, 24 pair of arch bar trucks, 12 of the twin pocket hoppers, two gondolas, and one final 4-6-0, “the very last,” at $49.95.

The second mimeographed price sheet is not dated but dates to after 1968. The street address is now in Millersburg, PA. Mostly it is used OO, he seems to be disbursing items from an outside 3rd rail layout, but he has 24 pair of Schorr Bettendorf trucks and 6 pair of arch bar trucks at $2.50 each. So, prices have gone up a bit, perhaps he could not order that larger batch of 500 in 1966 and had to pay a higher price per unit? The kicker though is that the final item on the list is “Penn Central decals as used on PC diesels.” Penn Central did not start up until 1968, so this list could actually be from the early 1970s. Perhaps he had a buddy who worked up some OO decals for the PC? It would have been clear to him and whoever received it at the time. Schorr passed away in 1976.

The other brass maker of the 1960s is one with only a little info out there, Guild of the Iron Horse. One thing is clear, they never advertised, it was all by correspondence. Appears to really have been conceptualized as a guild with members working together toward producing OO models. If this was a viable model, it seems not. I’ve written on this firm before (here, and be sure to scroll down to the updates); the main things to note are the owner started off trying to make a better version of the Nason 4-4-2, then seems to have had a maker in probably Japan produce an even better 4-4-2 and more. This comment below, received in February, 2018 to another article from ruxtonite, sums it up well:

The mystery maker is Jerome Bailey Foster. He was an Architect. He was the owner of "The Guild of the Iron Horse" which was located in Winchester, Massachusetts. The company was inherited by his daughter who then transferred the ownership to Mr. Alfred Spice Jr. In February 1968 on the 27th day.

Which leads us to the final part of this series on OO in the 1960s, where we look more at Alfred “Bud” Spice.  More soon.

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