The online magazine on the history and operation of vintage scale model trains in American OO gauge

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

An amazing ATSF 2-8-2 by James Trout, and the art of scratch building steam

The name of James Trout has come up a few times in this site now, but for quick reference he was a longtime Disney illustrator and an American OO enthusiast (longer overview here).

Among his interests were the ATSF, and he built this fine model of ATSF 2-8-2 4027. Internet resources I’m finding would indicate the prototype is a Baldwin product from 1923.

This model is simply outstanding and a prime example of scratch building from a time before the Internet and other distractions. All in all, the craftsmanship is just so high, it is intimidating if I am honest. I could never duplicate this model. Click on any of the photos for a bigger view.

When 4027 got to me it would not run, as the motor was damaged. I was able to fix that by switching out some parts; and the model bench tests fine now! Unfortunately, there is a short on the insulated side of one of the drivers, so it won’t run down the track. It might be due to some subtly bent part that I’m not seeing, but, even then, the model is too large to run on my curves, so I think it is best to leave it as it is, a beautiful display model.

I still had it in a box to work on among my projects, as a cab seat fell out after working on the drive. With the model apart, it was a good time to also take some photos for this article. The boiler is held on with just two small screws.

Starting with the boiler, wow. Maybe some commercial fittings here and there, but this is quite an impressive, one of a kind model in 4mm scale. Lots of Santa Fe specific details, so many neatly fabricated and soldered parts and wires, and of course the hand lettered numbers. It is a little dusty from prior display, but I’m thinking it would not be a good idea to clean it aggressively.

Surprisingly, the back head of the boiler, in the cab, is not detailed at all, but note the side curtains made from tissue paper. And the window glass is, of course, real glass.

The frame holds a secret that is not easy to see in the photos; this model is actually built on a Nason 2-8-0 frame and possibly drivers, with the lead truck being modified Nason. Look at all those added details! The front coupler it should be noted is a working coupler, built to scale. The side rods and such are certainly not Nason, he fabricated parts that are accurate to scale.

To the tender, that is all scratch built, other than the Kadee coupler on the rear. That I believe was added much later, the model itself I would guess to date from maybe 1950. There is an old repair to the back of the tender that is not nearly as finely done as the model itself, perhaps done at the same time as the Kadee installation.

Speaking of scratch building, this is also not very visible in the photos but what are those trucks on the tender? They are not commercial and are actually built up from many parts. The journal boxes are sprung with small springs, etc.; the work that must have been required merely to fabricate those trucks from scratch is mind boggling. Today one would think about 3D printing unusual parts such as these.

This is absolutely the most exquisite model I own. Growing up on the ATSF it is a huge treat to own this engine.

In addition to this one locomotive, I own a variety of passenger and freight cars from his workshop. I am so glad to be able to own a group of the Trout models, some of which have been featured in this site previously. With others of his needing similar small repairs, and an ongoing reorganization of my storage system, be watching for more of his models to be featured here.

A final note would be there are other Trout locomotives out there. I have photos of some of them, models for his West Coast Lines and for sure one more big ATSF engine, 4-8-4 3763. May they all be long enjoyed by others.

Thursday, June 7, 2018

American OO in the 1960s, part I: Too invested to quit

After a hiatus of a few years it is finally time to continue the OO history series. By the 1960s products had commercially slowed down to a trickle in American OO, but there was a core group of individuals very dedicated to the scale and gauge active over this entire decade. This series, as it continues, will begin to be their story.

Kicking off things off, 1961 was a year that saw the Greenbrook of David Sacks on the move! Two articles in particular have been previously posted here that relate to the Greenbrook, with the layout being featured in the August, 1961 issue of Model Railroader:


Moving on in 1961, a second run of Schorr 4-6-0 models were reaching the USA from Japan. Schorr by this point relied on essentially direct mail correspondence to market his models, and this photo has a hand-written note from Schorr on the back. Delivery was slated for December, 1961, price $39.95, “reserve yours now!” The original run of this model was listed as being available in 1956, and the 1957 price/sales sheet says “only a few of these left.”

There was more quietly going on, a good example being found in the March, 1964 issue of Model Railroader. There we find an article on signals, but the layout featured is actually an OO layout with nice photos. The author, C. Kenneth Hurd, a dentist by profession, had published several prior articles on signals and other electrical concerns. There is an earlier photo of his layout in an article on automatic interlocking in the June, 1946 issue of MR, and intriguing photos of a trolley layout in an article on train control in the Feb. 47 MR, but it unfortunately does not state that those models are OO. This present article, “How I built my layout – with signals” provides an “easy-to-understand contact arrangement” that “controls signals and stops trains automatically.”

There is a scale drawing of his large, 8 x 20-foot layout and several photos, this being the best of the group, showing how the passenger train has “passed far enough beyond the signal bridge to change the signal at right from green (upper lamp) to red.” That the signal system is applied to an OO scale layout he only notes well into the article, where he states, ”I’m afraid the gauge I use dates me, for old-timers will spot Nason, Lionel, Scale-Craft, and other makes of OO scale equipment in the photos.” He also in the next paragraph talks about his track; a large layout with signals needs good track!
I discovered that the die-cut paper tie strip I used would not hold the gauge; the ties would warp and pull the rails together. I changed to the Midlin type with one rail fixed in wooden ties and a slit for the other rail. [Midlin track has not been made for some time, and few, if any, shops still have it. – Ed.]
The editor’s note is significant too (and I have more on Midlin here). Taken together, American OO was not a major player by 1964, but people like Kenneth Hurd were invested enough in the scale to keep on going with projects that interested them, such as developing a working signal system.

Worth mentioning as well, from the same issue of Model Railroader, Eastern was still in business and had just moved their operations from New Jersey to Montana. They would run a monthly ad in MR. for many years; you could still buy their OO kits from them into the 1980s.

Before closing, an aside on this series as it continues into the 1960s and beyond. With years of effort and some much appreciated help I own physical copies of all but about a dozen magazines before 1960, and I have in fact skimmed/read and taken OO related notes on nearly every issue of every model railroad magazine before 1960. But as this series goes forward I have not read every magazine (owning a lot, but not all), and I turn to other notes I’ve developed. I don’t recall who pointed me at this 1964 article, but in short I am in appreciation to many people over years of looking at the history of American OO.

As the series continues we look to the late 1960s.

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

A Mantua 4-4-0 converted to OO

It is fairly well known in the American OO community that the Mantua/Tyco 4-6-0 is actually a 1/76 scale model, but gauged to run on HO track. The tender and boiler are correct for OO, and even the cylinder block is wide enough to work with no modification. The model is based on Sierra Railroad No. 3. More on this model here, along with a view of the below model "before."

I was never wild about how that model turned out. It ran OK but the drivers just seem so small. Then recently I had an idea. I have some spare drivers which I think were made for Bill Johann as part of his 2-8-2 project by Mantua. They are too big to fit on the model as a 4-6-0, but if you leave the front driver off entirely you get this I think rather successful model.

The cab, as noted in the prior article, is a Scale-Craft 4-6-0 cab instead of the stock cab. I wanted to give the model the look of an old engine still in use in the 1930s or 40s even. For an older time look, you can of course use the original cab.

Being really very pleased how this came out (I like the spacing and size of the drivers a lot) I am doing a second conversion, and this view shows the frame. I have another shortline 4-4-0 in mind, along the lines of engines seen in the classic book Mixed Train Daily, a favorite of mine when I was first getting into the hobby.

The only touchy part of the job is that you have to pull apart a driver and mount the original gear on it using a NWSL quartering jig. It ended up not being as difficult to do as I thought it might, which was encouraging as I have a number of steam projects backed up on the workbench.

I should note that Mantua/Tyco sold this same basic model also as a 2-6-0 and a 4-8-0. I had always liked the look of the 2-6-0 and purchased one of them as well. Alas, the setup of the drive rods is different and it would be a lot more trouble to get that all set up correctly with OO drivers. But the good news there is I can see a way to use that frame and the vintage Mantua/Johann drivers on another project engine, a 2-6-2. If I can get that one running by the end of the summer I will feel that I got something big done.