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Saturday, October 28, 2017

A closer look at two etched zinc cars

A recent arrival was an example of an early, pre-war boxcar by Oscar Andresen. I have now several of these cars, and there is some comparison to be made between this boxcar and the stock car, which was previously described in this article. 

One of the most interesting comparisons for me is you can see how the stock car has the outside ribs, and the boxcar does not. This is something that the builder was to add.

Backing up a step though, note the raised Rock Haven lettering on the boxcar. Except for my stock car every one of his models I have ever seen has the raised lettering for one of his personal roads. His idea I believe was that you would touch the raised lettering with paint different than the background paint, in those days when decals were a novelty. However, I can see how the stock car should have lettering as well, matching an identical car owned by Jack Bartman (as posted in the American OO Facebook group). The Mohawk Valley 8502 lettering was sanded off by the builder – which is understandable, if your home road is not the Mohawk Valley.

I only have one boxcar door and I marvel at how light and delicate the zinc etching is. It is as thin as though it was stamped brass, but the material is lighter.

On the other hand, the boxcar is a bit curious, as it is clearly an outside braced car but there are no horizontal boards visible. Was his idea being it was a plywood car? Or steel?

The stock car has no frame, but the Nason frame seen on the boxcar is a good choice.

The boxcar also has a cast aluminum Nason roof walk, from the cast Nason boxcar. That being there is a lucky find, as I was lacking that part for my boxcar casting project. So, I will be taking that off and making a mold soon.

The bigger picture thing is the topic of actually finishing one of these cars. I would like to finish the stock car, actually, using salvaged S-C doors. The big problem is cleaning it for painting, which I will just have to carefully tackle at some point. Hopefully I can get that corrosion off with a Q-tip and care.

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