The online magazine on the history and operation of vintage scale model trains in American OO gauge

Thursday, June 22, 2017

S-C reefers with Tichy decals

Part of my recent push to work on reefers involved these three Scale-Craft reefers.

They were all in pretty rough shape and were missing some parts. I decided to put them back to the best condition I reasonably could without being real heroic about it. My main goal for the project was to make use of my newly purchased Tichy OO scale PFE decals. (More on the Tichy decals here). Missing parts were replaced, but I did not change any of the cars particularly compared to how the original builders constructed these pre-war models. Two cars have the frames that have the bolsters away from the ends too far and one has the trucks at the more correct location of models made closer to WWII.With the black trucks on the layout the difference is not very noticeable.

The big thing was painting. I sprayed them with three colors from cans. The sides are the critical item and for that I used Testors Grabber Orange. This is actually a Ford car color but is a good stand-in for PFE orange. The sides were masked off (after that cured thoroughly), then I painted the brown and let that cure and masked again to paint the frame and that strip at the bottom of the sides flat black. The effect came out really well, click on the photos for a better view.

And the decals also really make the cars, they look great. The only thing to note as a big quirk of this decal set is that the logos want to curl up rather than snuggle down! I actually had to put foam and a weight on top of them to hold them down flat after application.

One car it may be noted has the variation of the paint scheme where only one logo is seen per side. That car actually had some paint lift on the side right in the middle, so the logo there covered that.

They are all on trucks rebuilt with the 3D printed S-C bolsters and operate great. I am very pleased how they came out, especially compared to where they started. The sand-cast details are clunky of course but have their own charm, I will enjoy running these cars.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Castings! Part III, fine tuning methods

Continuing the series, I have kept plugging away on this project of trying to make resin castings of American OO car bodies.

The initial castings were OK but I felt that some parts needed a stiffer resin. Micro-Mark sells three types, I had been using the medium type but tried the harder one. For these parts in the photo I think the harder resin is a plus, the section is fairly thin and you can feel the difference. For thicker parts, however, I noted that the difference was hardly noticeable.

So, my plan for now is to use up all the medium resin making those thicker parts and keep working to make the parts that need the harder resin too.

There were also some parts I was trying to make in vintage molds that were made by Temple Nieter in the 1970s. The issue has been even using very heavy coatings of mold release those molds tend to want to stick and tear. Bottom line is that I will need to back off using those molds. Fortunately, I have made some good copies of the hopper car side now and I have originals of the ends and another needed part.

The next purchase will be more of the mold making material. I am wishing I had made my new molds generally larger and thicker, so that is another tweak coming in the next batch of molds. I may try to make another car type in the molds, too, pondering needs and what materials are on hand.

As to offering these for sale, at this point hardly any parts are actually perfect to the level I would sell them, if I do go that direction that is a ways in the future. And, with the cure time involved, I only at best get one good part a day.

But with that I think there is enough info here for any of you out there thinking about making a mold and casting parts to give it a try. It is not that hard to do really, the most time-consuming part is mostly setup. Give it a try!

Return to Part I of series

Continue in series

Sunday, June 11, 2017

The great truck project of 2017

Over the years I know that I tend to get going on projects that are not what I thought I might get going on.

In this case, I hoped to be working on steam locomotives now but the big early summer project was working up some good trucks -- quite a lot of them. Some examples are seen here. Up at the upper left are some of the first part of the project. I like cars in the collection to be on working trucks, and I had several that while they were working Nason trucks they were unpainted and also three-rail trucks. I thought though, they could be reworked, and from experience I know they potentially can roll really well and should be on good cars. So those I updated with vintage Ultimate wheelsets made for use in Scale-Craft trucks, in the process working through a number of cars in the collection (mostly with printed sides) so that every car is on working trucks.

That got my truck supply down a bit, but then the 3D printed Scale-Craft bolsters arrived, as described in this article. I had parts saved from a number of trucks that had been assembled and running at some point in the past, but lacked bolsters to get them running. Which had been bothering me for years, not to mention that I had "complete" trucks that would hardly roll and needed attention.

All the S-C trucks in the photo have the 3D bolsters. The freight trucks above were built up with vintage parts, making sure that the wheels all match.

The 6 wheel passenger trucks have more of a story. I had several more sets of side frames and wheels that would work but no extra of the brass bolsters for many years. Then, in some parts, a supply of that part came but they were oddball parts in that the holes were drilled out (at the factory!) too big! You could not use S-C screws or any other screws the size that would pass through a standard S-C bolster hole.

However, 3D bolsters to the rescue, it is easy to drill them out bigger, which would allow me to use 2-56 screws to finish them off. The shiny wheelsets are Ultimate (Bud Spice) wheelsets. I find that their passenger wheelsets can only be used in the 6-wheel trucks, in 4-wheels trucks things flex too much and they end up shorting out all the time. I have completely run down my supply of these, although I do have some extra freight wheels.

All of the trucks seen in the photo are super square and roll great. And finally the truck project is slowing down, as I ran the parts supply down pretty good and have quite a number of trucks ready for cars. I have just a few more six wheel passenger trucks to attempt to work over, sideframes having been modified by a prior owner but probably can be set up still with Kemtron wheels, which I have a few of. With the other next step being some evaluation of how many trucks are on hand in relation to projects and project cars -- if there are enough extras some of these trucks will end up on eBay to help some other people out.

UPDATE: I quickly gave in and worked over three pair of basket case S-C 6-wheel truck sideframes to make very workable trucks. In total to now I have made 60 bolsters from the 3D parts, they have solved many problems.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Castings! Part II, making the first resin castings

In the set from Micro-Mark they include a casting resin. It is the medium type of what they sell in terms of speed to cure and hardness. I found it to work pretty well for working out techniques with these molds.

The first castings were not great. One big adjustment was that compared to when I make metal castings you need to vent the mold more, to allow air bubbles to escape. I think the weight of the molten metal tends to push out the bubbles better.

Prior to casting you spray on the mold release material for the resin, which is a different release than used when making the molds. The resin material said it had a working life of 7 minutes but in reality, the material was the most liquid – almost like water – for the first 3 minutes or so. Pour it quickly!

My very first test casting I made in an old mold that I had actually never used (a Famoco baggage car end) and it came out pretty well. So, I forged on. I colored the resin using some brown colorant I had from when I tried to make castings in high school, not always the same amount, so the color ranged from white to the darker hue seen.

Another item to note is you have to make wood blocks to clamp the mold tightly with rubber bands. I tried a couple other methods, but in the flat wood blocks and rubber bands really work the best.

My initial work focused on the parts for the Nason sand-cast boxcar.

But with things going fairly well I got to thinking back to the Nieter molds that I had purchased, in particular two large parts, his version of sides for the Graceline hopper and also the Limco P54 (MP54) passenger car. I found that I needed to use a heavy coat of mold release but they otherwise worked fine with some extra venting! This was particularly exciting with the hopper sides, as I have a half dozen of the wood block bodies that are for this car but have no sides and few ends. The actual sides are pressed cardboard, which Nieter modified to make a mold from. I may try his idea with some of the other Graceline sides too, if I can ultimately get castings of high enough quality.

As to the Limco car, I have molds for the sides, ends, underframe, and trucks. Not sure there is much demand for this car, but I will try to make at least one complete model of this too.

In terms of time this all takes some time but not that much also. Basically, there is a setup to do, and you have to have a clear working space for it, but at any given step you won’t spend much over 15 minutes at a time. After that it is just a waiting game for the material to cure.

The good news is many of the castings are usable in terms of not too many bubbles. The bad news is the casting material is a bit too flexible in the thin sections that I am working with to actually use them on a car. So, for now I things are stalled and I have a harder resin on order. It should work better, but will slow production down too as the cure time is 16 hours.

In any case though I am happy with how things have gone so far and be looking for a part III with hopefully some castings that can be used on models.

Continue to Part III

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Castings! Part I, making the molds

Going way back to my roots in American OO, when I was in high school I was making molds and castings with the help of Temple Nieter, described further in this article. Between then and 2008 I had hardly made any new castings in the molds (and all were metal castings as well, I had never had luck with casting resins), and I had not had the inclination to make any new molds either.

But then a project comes along and inspires you a bit, and in my case, it was the acquisition of one almost complete Nason sand cast aluminum boxcar and three key parts of another. I at the least wanted to try to duplicate the missing pieces for the second car and who knows, maybe I could duplicate the entire car?

After considering options I decided to order the resin casting starter set that Micro-Mark sells, and it does have all you need to get started.

To make the molds I used the same methods Temple taught me with really no big tweaks, mostly illustrated in the photos with this article. First step is to put a layer of the clay material (it is not actually clay, it won’t dry out) down (I put it on a piece of metal) and roll it flat. Put the part on it and put it half way down into the clay. You will need to make fences from metal (using clips to keep it closed) and also use a screwdriver or punch to put holes in the clay to serve as keys for the other half of the mold.

They supply a mold release that you brush on, it worked well. Years ago, I found mold release to be a big issue, the one supplied by the maker I used then did not work. I ended up using spray wax which was a solution but not a great one. The liquid supplied by Micro-Mark works.

Then you pour the first half. When the mold material has cured you pull the mold up and invert it. Put up the fences again, apply plenty of mold release again, and pour the second half. And with that you will soon have a two-part mold of your part.

When you have the mold halves separated cut in the needed vents and fill holes with a hobby knife.

In part II we will look at my initial attempts to make resin castings.